Museum open Tuesday-Thursday, Saturday-Sunday and Bank Holidays 10.30pm to 5pm
Donations by Text – Text DHAM15 £10 to 70070


Airspeed AS.51 & 58 Horsa Glider

In World War 2, towed transport gliders were built in large numbers to air-land troops with weapons far behind enemy lines, without needing parachute training, and with far less scattering.

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British Aerospace BAe 146-100

The BAe 146 was built by British Aerospace as a short-haul airliner/regional jet. The BAe 146 has a high monoplane wing with a T-tail configuration and four turbofan engines. A total of 221 were built between 1983 and 1992.

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de Havilland Cierva C.24 Autogiro

The C.24 was the only rotorcraft built by de Havilland, and only this one example was built. It was acquired by the Science Museum in 1974, and is now on permanent loan to this museum. The engine is the original, but the twisted slab propeller is not.

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de Havilland DH100 Vampire FB.6

Designed at Salisbury Hall, and built and first flown at Hatfield in 1943, the Vampire single-seat fighter was the first de Havilland jet aircraft. It is of compact pod and twin-boom design, with a single DH Goblin centrifugal turbojet behind the cockpit, fed by wing-root air intakes. Given the modest thrust of the early turbojets, this configuration offered short intake ducts and jet pipe, for minimum propulsive losses, and with the hot exhaust passing below the tailplane. The rear engine freed nose space for a retractable tricycle undercarriage, giving an excellent forward view for the pilot, the raised tail avoiding jet exhaust damage to airfield turf and tarmac.

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de Havilland DH103 Sea Hornet NF.21 (tail section)

The DH103 Sea Hornet was a two seater Night-Fighter (NF) version of the DH103 Hornet and was produced to specification N.21/45, design modifications being entrusted to Heston Aircraft who had previously designed the Sea Hornet’s folding wing. Flame dampening exhausts were fitted and a second crew member was a radar navigator, situated separately behind the wing facing aft during flight.

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de Havilland DH104 Dove Mk.8

The Museum’s exhibit, Dove 8, was built at Chester in 1961. It was initially the company’s type demonstrator, later used as a 6-seat VIP communications aircraft by Hawker Siddeley, then British Aerospace. It was moved to the Museum in 2000.

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de Havilland DH104 Dove Mk6

The Museum’s exhibit, Dove 6, D-IFSB was acquired in 1979, and was originally built at Chester in 1953 as a Dove 2A. It was later converted, and used in Germany for electronic/radio landing system research and development, using a variety of special equipment shown e.g. by the radio antennas and internal equipment. The nose houses a small searchlight with a belt drive for rotation in azimuth.

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de Havilland DH106 Comet 1A

The de Havilland DH106 ‘Comet’ was the World’s first turbojet-powered airliner, designed and built at Hatfield and first flown by John Cunningham in 1949.

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de Havilland DH106 Comet 2R

The Museum’s exhibit, XK695 was retired to the Imperial War Museum (IWM) Duxford in 1975 having completed flying 8,236 hours in over 3,200 flights. Because of excessive corrosion, it was dismantled in 1992. The surviving nose and front fuselage was donated to the Museum in 1995, by Hanningfield Metals in Essex. The supporting metal frame was sponsored by City Steel of St Albans.

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de Havilland DH106 Comet 4

The Museum’s exhibit is a Comet 4 analogue flight simulator for crew training was built for BOAC by Redifon Flight Simulation at Crawley. It used a redundant Comet 2 front fuselage, but with functioning cockpit equipment and instruments installed to Comet 4 standard. Such simulators offered flight crew training at low cost and in complete safety. Ownership of the simulator was transferred to Dan-Air in 1970, when BOAC sold its Comet 4s. After being used for a total of 10,660 training hours, the flight simulator was taken out of service in 1983 when Dan-Air retired its Comet fleet. It was kept at the Science Museum’s store at Wroughton until 1996, when it was offered to this Museum, and transported here.

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