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de Havilland Gipsy Six

The Gipsy Six engine was used to power the DH89 Dragon Rapide and the four-engined DH86. A developed version powered the DH88 Comet racer,the winner of the England to Australia air race in 1934.

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de Havilland Gipsy Major

First built in 1932, total production of all Gipsy Major versions was 14,615 units. In Canada the Gipsy Major was the engine of choice for the DHC1 Chipmunk trainer, which later replaced the Tiger Moth in the RAF .

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de Havilland Gipsy III

The Gipsy III engine was the first to be designed by the English aircraft designer, Major Frank Halford with the cylinders inverted to give a better view for the pilot and less drag. The engine was used to power the DH80A Puss Moth.

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de Havilland DH113 Vampire NF10

Although developed earlier than the Venom, the DH113 Vampire Night-Fighter (NF) had a later type number in the company sequence by the time it was produced.

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de Havilland DH112 Venom NF.3

The Museum’s exhibit, registration WX853, a DH112 Venom NF.3 WX853 c/n 12682, was built at Chester to contract 7162 and was ready for collection on 27th July 1955, where it was delivered across the airfield to 48 MU the next day.

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de Havilland DH112 Venom FB.4

The Museum’s exhibit, registration WR539, a DH112 Venom FB.4 c/n 12240, was assembled by Fairey Aviation at Ringway and was ready for collection on 27 January 1956, being delivered to 22 MU on 1st February.

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de Havilland DH88 Comet Racer

De Havilland designed and built the DH88 Comet Racer in nine months as a response to a chance in winning an air race proposed by Sir MacPherson Robertson in October of 1934.

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British Aerospace BAe 146-100

The BAe 146 was built by British Aerospace as a short-haul airliner/regional jet. The BAe 146 has a high monoplane wing with a T-tail configuration and four turbofan engines. A total of 221 were built between 1983 and 1992.

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de Havilland DH89A Dragon Rapide

The DH89A Dragon Rapide is an all-wood, twin-engine biplane passenger aircraft. The first flight of the prototype was from Hatfield by Hubert Broad on 17th April 1934. The first operator was Hillman Airways from Maylands Airport at Romford, their first aircraft G-ACPM making its debut at Hatfield on 13 July 1934 when Hubert Broad averaged 158 mph in the King’s Cup Air Race, before having to retire due to hail damage.

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Airspeed AS.51 & 58 Horsa Glider

In World War 2, towed transport gliders were built in large numbers to air-land troops with weapons far behind enemy lines, without needing parachute training, and with far less scattering.

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