The Museum is now closed for the winter – reopening on 11th February 2018
Donations by Text – Text DHAM15 £10 to 70070


de Havilland DH112 Sea Venom FAW.22

Designed and built at Hatfield and first flown in 1949, the DH112 Venom single-seat fighter was a progressive development of the Vampire. It had a fatter fuselage ‘pod’ to take the much larger, higher thrust DH Ghost engine, and a thinner wing (10% instead of 14%) with 17 degree leading-edge sweep for higher critical Mach number. It was the first RAF fighter to have wing-tip fuel tanks, the wing being stressed for combat with these tanks full. The Sea Venom FAW.20, 21 and 22 (Fighter, All-Weather) were successive two-seat radar-equipped variants for the Fleet Air Arm.

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de Havilland DH112 Venom FB.4

The Museum’s exhibit, registration WR539, a DH112 Venom FB.4 c/n 12240, was assembled by Fairey Aviation at Ringway and was ready for collection on 27 January 1956, being delivered to 22 MU on 1st February.

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de Havilland DH112 Venom NF.3

The Museum’s exhibit, registration WX853, a DH112 Venom NF.3 WX853 c/n 12682, was built at Chester to contract 7162 and was ready for collection on 27th July 1955, where it was delivered across the airfield to 48 MU the next day.

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de Havilland DH113 Vampire NF10

Although developed earlier than the Venom, the DH113 Vampire Night-Fighter (NF) had a later type number in the company sequence by the time it was produced.

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de Havilland DH114 Heron Mk.2D

Designed at Hatfield, and first flown in 1950, the Heron feeder airliner was effectively a stretched four-engine version of the Dove. It was unpressurised, flown by a crew of two and able to carry up to 17 passengers, or 14 with a lavatory compartment fitted. It used Dove outer wing panels, and Dove nose and tail units joined by an extended fuselage. As with the Dove, the airframe, engines and propellers were all made by de Havilland.

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de Havilland DH115 Vampire T.11

The Vampire T.11 was the first advanced jet fighter trainer to use side-by-side seating. It was argued that having the instructor beside him gave the trainee a higher level of confidence, enabled each to see better what the other was doing, and gave both the same gun-sight view. So the existing broad fuselage ‘pod’ of the Vampire NF.10 two-seat radar night fighter was adapted for the dual control trainer. The wings, intakes, tail booms, undercarriage, engine installation, control, fuel tanks, identification light etc., are essentially similar to those of the Vampire FB.6.

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de Havilland DH121 Trident

First flown in 1962, the Trident was the second turbojet airliner designed and built at Hatfield. It was designed for speed and economy on short-haul operations by British European Airways, with an advanced 35 degree swept wing for cruise at Mach 0.88. The Trident broke new ground by having three engines, and by having all three at the rear (with the middle engine buried below the fin) so placing the jet exhaust noise behind the passenger cabin. The Trident was also the first airliner in the World to be designed and certified for automatic landing, with the Smiths Industries ‘Autoland’ system.

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de Havilland DH125

Designed at Hatfield, and first flown there in 1962, the de Havilland DH125 executive aircraft was the jet successor to the Dove. It was made simple for low cost e.g. with no thrust reversers or engine silencers, and low wing sweep with no leading-edge flaps or slats.

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de Havilland DH53 Humming Bird

The DH53 Humming Bird was de Havillands’ first venture into the light plane field. It was fitted with a 750cc Douglas motorcycle engine, later, the 26 hp Blackburne Tomtit 670cc engine. The DH53 Humming Bird was ordered by the Royal Air Force and also for experimental work; this included launching and retrieval from the airship, R-33. Two DH53s were fitted with a pylon and pick-up gear for attachment to a trapeze lowered from the airship.

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de Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth

The Museum’s exhibit was built as N6550 at Hatfield in 1939, was used for training during the War. In 1956 it was converted for crop-dusting, as a single-seater flown from the rear cockpit. The hopper was placed in the front cockpit position, at the centre-of-gravity, to maintain aircraft balance whatever the hopper load level. Dispersion used a broad metal venture spreader, mounted below the fuselage and stiffened by a pair of dividers in the duct. Released under pilot control, the powder and granular chemicals were drawn by gravity and suction down into the spreader, where they were entrained by the airflow through the device, and spread laterally behind the aircraft. Last used in 1961, the aircraft was acquired by the Museum in 1976 and restored in 1991, with the engine returned to ground running condition.

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