Museum Open 6 Days a week (closed Mondays) and open on Bank Holidays
Donations by Text – Text DHAM15 £10 to 70070


de Havilland DH103 Sea Hornet NF.21 (tail section)

The DH103 Sea Hornet was a two seater Night-Fighter (NF) version of the DH103 Hornet and was produced to specification N.21/45, design modifications being entrusted to Heston Aircraft who had previously designed the Sea Hornet’s folding wing. Flame dampening exhausts were fitted and a second crew member was a radar navigator, situated separately behind the wing facing aft during flight.

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de Havilland DH53 Humming Bird

The DH53 Humming Bird was de Havillands’ first venture into the light plane field. It was fitted with a 750cc Douglas motorcycle engine, later, the 26 hp Blackburne Tomtit 670cc engine. The DH53 Humming Bird was ordered by the Royal Air Force and also for experimental work; this included launching and retrieval from the airship, R-33. Two DH53s were fitted with a pylon and pick-up gear for attachment to a trapeze lowered from the airship.

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de Havilland DHC1 Chipmunk T.Mk.10

The first aircraft designed and built by de Havilland Canada, the Chipmunk tandem two-seat trainer first flew at Downsview, Toronto, in 1946. It was the cantilever monoplane successor to the Tiger Moth biplane.

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de Havilland DH104 Dove Mk.8

The Museum’s exhibit, Dove 8, was built at Chester in 1961. It was initially the company’s type demonstrator, later used as a 6-seat VIP communications aircraft by Hawker Siddeley, then British Aerospace. It was moved to the Museum in 2000.

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de Havilland DH114 Heron Mk.2D

Designed at Hatfield, and first flown in 1950, the Heron feeder airliner was effectively a stretched four-engine version of the Dove. It was unpressurised, flown by a crew of two and able to carry up to 17 passengers, or 14 with a lavatory compartment fitted. It used Dove outer wing panels, and Dove nose and tail units joined by an extended fuselage. As with the Dove, the airframe, engines and propellers were all made by de Havilland.

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de Havilland DH106 Comet 4

The Museum’s exhibit is a Comet 4 analogue flight simulator for crew training was built for BOAC by Redifon Flight Simulation at Crawley. It used a redundant Comet 2 front fuselage, but with functioning cockpit equipment and instruments installed to Comet 4 standard. Such simulators offered flight crew training at low cost and in complete safety. Ownership of the simulator was transferred to Dan-Air in 1970, when BOAC sold its Comet 4s. After being used for a total of 10,660 training hours, the flight simulator was taken out of service in 1983 when Dan-Air retired its Comet fleet. It was kept at the Science Museum’s store at Wroughton until 1996, when it was offered to this Museum, and transported here.

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de Havilland DH106 Comet 2R

The Museum’s exhibit, XK695 was retired to the Imperial War Museum (IWM) Duxford in 1975 having completed flying 8,236 hours in over 3,200 flights. Because of excessive corrosion, it was dismantled in 1992. The surviving nose and front fuselage was donated to the Museum in 1995, by Hanningfield Metals in Essex. The supporting metal frame was sponsored by City Steel of St Albans.

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de Havilland DH112 Sea Venom FAW.22

Designed and built at Hatfield and first flown in 1949, the DH112 Venom single-seat fighter was a progressive development of the Vampire. It had a fatter fuselage ‘pod’ to take the much larger, higher thrust DH Ghost engine, and a thinner wing (10% instead of 14%) with 17 degree leading-edge sweep for higher critical Mach number. It was the first RAF fighter to have wing-tip fuel tanks, the wing being stressed for combat with these tanks full. The Sea Venom FAW.20, 21 and 22 (Fighter, All-Weather) were successive two-seat radar-equipped variants for the Fleet Air Arm.

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de Havilland DH98 Mosquito B.Mk.35

The Museum’s exhibit flew in 1945 as a B.Mk.35, and was later adapted for target-towing with an electrically-driven winch in the bomb-bay. It was acquired in 1971, and converted for display purposes back to B.Mk.35 form, in the markings of No. 571 (Pathfinder Force) sqn, Royal Air Force.

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de Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth

The Museum’s exhibit was built as N6550 at Hatfield in 1939, was used for training during the War. In 1956 it was converted for crop-dusting, as a single-seater flown from the rear cockpit. The hopper was placed in the front cockpit position, at the centre-of-gravity, to maintain aircraft balance whatever the hopper load level. Dispersion used a broad metal venture spreader, mounted below the fuselage and stiffened by a pair of dividers in the duct. Released under pilot control, the powder and granular chemicals were drawn by gravity and suction down into the spreader, where they were entrained by the airflow through the device, and spread laterally behind the aircraft. Last used in 1961, the aircraft was acquired by the Museum in 1976 and restored in 1991, with the engine returned to ground running condition.

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