The Museum is now closed for the winter – reopening on 11th February 2018
Donations by Text – Text DHAM15 £10 to 70070


de Havilland DH82B Queen Bee

The Museum’s exhibit is one of only two left in the UK, was built by Scottish Aviation Ltd of Glasgow in 1943 and flew at least three times for the Army guns off Manorber, South Wales until March 1946, it was acquired in incomplete form in 1986 and restored in its original colours and markings. For demonstration purposes, solid-state electronics provide control from a remote console, the windmill drives a small generator, and the engine is a shell only, with an electric (car starter) motor and straight shaft.

Read More...

de Havilland DH87B Hornet Moth

The Museum’s exhibit was built at Hatfield in 1935 as the last of the DH87A type, and first flown by Geoffrey de Havilland himself. It was later converted to DH87B type with the rectangular wings. It saw wartime service as a communications aircraft. It was acquired in 1974 and restored by 1988. It has a simple vane-type Air Speed Indicator under the port upper-wing leading edge. But there is also a pitot-static head under the lower starboard wing.

Read More...

de Havilland DH88 Comet Racer

De Havilland designed and built the DH88 Comet Racer in nine months as a response to a chance in winning an air race proposed by Sir MacPherson Robertson in October of 1934.

Read More...

de Havilland DH89A Dragon Rapide

The DH89A Dragon Rapide is an all-wood, twin-engine biplane passenger aircraft. The first flight of the prototype was from Hatfield by Hubert Broad on 17th April 1934. The first operator was Hillman Airways from Maylands Airport at Romford, their first aircraft G-ACPM making its debut at Hatfield on 13 July 1934 when Hubert Broad averaged 158 mph in the King’s Cup Air Race, before having to retire due to hail damage.

Read More...

de Havilland DH98 Mosquito B.Mk.35

The Museum’s exhibit flew in 1945 as a B.Mk.35, and was later adapted for target-towing with an electrically-driven winch in the bomb-bay. It was acquired in 1971, and converted for display purposes back to B.Mk.35 form, in the markings of No. 571 (Pathfinder Force) sqn, Royal Air Force.

Read More...

de Havilland DH98 Mosquito FB Mk.VI

First flown in 1942, the Mosquito FB Mk.VI fighter-bomber was intended for ‘intruder’ strike missions, and became the most numerous and widely-used Mosquito variant. Based on the F Mk.II day fighter version without Air Interception radar, it retained the formidable armament of four Browning 0.303 in machine-guns in the nose and four Hispano 20 mm canon in the belly. But it was also given a bomb-bay behind the cannon, which enabled it to carry two 500 lb bombs internally (with fins cropped to fit) plus another two under the wings.

Read More...

de Havilland DH98 Mosquito Prototype

The fast, high-flying Mosquito was for much of the War able to roam almost at will over enemy-occupied territory. Built of non-strategic materials (i.e. wood), it was designed for speed and range as a two-seat unarmed light bomber, unarmed reconnaissance aircraft and long range fighter. Its performance derived from a combination of; careful packaging, an aerodynamically clean shape, a high wing loading, and high power from two supercharged liquid-cooled V-12 Merlin engines.

Read More...

de Havilland DHC1 Chipmunk T.Mk.10

The first aircraft designed and built by de Havilland Canada, the Chipmunk tandem two-seat trainer first flew at Downsview, Toronto, in 1946. It was the cantilever monoplane successor to the Tiger Moth biplane.

Read More...

de Havilland Ghost Mk. 104

The military version of the de Havilland Ghost was the Mk. 104 used to power the DH112 Venom Fighter-Bomber (FB), the Venom Night-Fighter (NF) and the Sea Venom.

Read More...

de Havilland Gipsy III

The Gipsy III engine was the first to be designed by the English aircraft designer, Major Frank Halford with the cylinders inverted to give a better view for the pilot and less drag. The engine was used to power the DH80A Puss Moth.

Read More...
« Previous Page Next Page »