Museum Open 6 Days a week (closed Mondays) and open on Bank Holidays
Donations by Text – Text DHAM15 £10 to 70070


de Havilland DH87B Hornet Moth

The Museum’s exhibit was built at Hatfield in 1935 as the last of the DH87A type, and first flown by Geoffrey de Havilland himself. It was later converted to DH87B type with the rectangular wings. It saw wartime service as a communications aircraft. It was acquired in 1974 and restored by 1988. It has a simple vane-type Air Speed Indicator under the port upper-wing leading edge. But there is also a pitot-static head under the lower starboard wing.

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de Havilland DH82B Queen Bee

The Museum’s exhibit is one of only two left in the UK, was built by Scottish Aviation Ltd of Glasgow in 1943 and flew at least three times for the Army guns off Manorber, South Wales until March 1946, it was acquired in incomplete form in 1986 and restored in its original colours and markings. For demonstration purposes, solid-state electronics provide control from a remote console, the windmill drives a small generator, and the engine is a shell only, with an electric (car starter) motor and straight shaft.

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de Havilland Cierva C.24 Autogiro

The C.24 was the only rotorcraft built by de Havilland, and only this one example was built. It was acquired by the Science Museum in 1974, and is now on permanent loan to this museum. The engine is the original, but the twisted slab propeller is not.

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de Havilland DH121 Trident

First flown in 1962, the Trident was the second turbojet airliner designed and built at Hatfield. It was designed for speed and economy on short-haul operations by British European Airways, with an advanced 35 degree swept wing for cruise at Mach 0.88. The Trident broke new ground by having three engines, and by having all three at the rear (with the middle engine buried below the fin) so placing the jet exhaust noise behind the passenger cabin. The Trident was also the first airliner in the World to be designed and certified for automatic landing, with the Smiths Industries ‘Autoland’ system.

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de Havilland DH125

Designed at Hatfield, and first flown there in 1962, the de Havilland DH125 executive aircraft was the jet successor to the Dove. It was made simple for low cost e.g. with no thrust reversers or engine silencers, and low wing sweep with no leading-edge flaps or slats.

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de Havilland DH106 Comet 1A

The de Havilland DH106 ‘Comet’ was the World’s first turbojet-powered airliner, designed and built at Hatfield and first flown by John Cunningham in 1949.

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de Havilland DH110 Sea Vixen FAW.2

Designed and built at Hatfield, the DH110 land-based two-seat, twin-engined all-weather fighter of 1951 was later adapted as the carrier-based Sea Vixen, the last and most advanced and comple of the de Havilland fighters.

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de Havilland DH115 Vampire T.11

The Vampire T.11 was the first advanced jet fighter trainer to use side-by-side seating. It was argued that having the instructor beside him gave the trainee a higher level of confidence, enabled each to see better what the other was doing, and gave both the same gun-sight view. So the existing broad fuselage ‘pod’ of the Vampire NF.10 two-seat radar night fighter was adapted for the dual control trainer. The wings, intakes, tail booms, undercarriage, engine installation, control, fuel tanks, identification light etc., are essentially similar to those of the Vampire FB.6.

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de Havilland DH100 Vampire FB.6

Designed at Salisbury Hall, and built and first flown at Hatfield in 1943, the Vampire single-seat fighter was the first de Havilland jet aircraft. It is of compact pod and twin-boom design, with a single DH Goblin centrifugal turbojet behind the cockpit, fed by wing-root air intakes. Given the modest thrust of the early turbojets, this configuration offered short intake ducts and jet pipe, for minimum propulsive losses, and with the hot exhaust passing below the tailplane. The rear engine freed nose space for a retractable tricycle undercarriage, giving an excellent forward view for the pilot, the raised tail avoiding jet exhaust damage to airfield turf and tarmac.

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de Havilland DH98 Mosquito FB Mk.VI

First flown in 1942, the Mosquito FB Mk.VI fighter-bomber was intended for ‘intruder’ strike missions, and became the most numerous and widely-used Mosquito variant. Based on the F Mk.II day fighter version without Air Interception radar, it retained the formidable armament of four Browning 0.303 in machine-guns in the nose and four Hispano 20 mm canon in the belly. But it was also given a bomb-bay behind the cannon, which enabled it to carry two 500 lb bombs internally (with fins cropped to fit) plus another two under the wings.

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